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"Where are you?"
"What do you mean,
where am I?"
"Where Are you?"
he repeated softly.
"I'm here."
"Where is here?"
~ Dan Millman

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Best of NH 2013

 

Season 6: awake Currier Museum of Art

Past Readings

Time Stands Still by Pulitzer Prize winning playwright Donald Margulies.
September 29, 2013, 2 pm at the Currier Museum of Art
Read in relation to the Currier’s special exhibition, Visual Dispatches from the Vietnam War.
Sarah and James – a photographer and a journalist – share a passion for the adrenaline rush caused from reporting in the world’s deadliest war zones. As reporters, their lives are devoted to telling the toughest stories from across the globe. But how do you separate yourself from the action you witness? How do you create an impartial lens? When their own story takes a sudden turn during a bomb blast in Iraq, the wounded Sarah returns home with James to the safety of New York. Can they settle into a more “conventional” life and leave behind the drama and chaos of war?

The American Dream by Pulitzer Prize and MacDowell Award recipient Edward Albee. 
January 12, 2014, 2 pm
at the Currier Museum of Art
Read in relation to the Currier’s special exhibition, Signs from the Sixties: Robert Indiana's Decade. Robert Indiana cites that seeing the original production of Albee’s play was a major inspiration his work of the same name.
Mommy and Daddy sit in a barren living room making small talk. Mommy, the domineering wife, is grappling with the thought of putting Grandma in a nursing home. Daddy, the long-suffering husband, could not care less. Mrs. Barker, the chairman of the women's club, arrives, not knowing why she is there. Is she there to take Grandma away? Apparently not. It all becomes evident when Grandma reveals to Mrs. Barker the story of the botched adoption of a "bumble of joy" twenty years ago by Mommy and Daddy. Mrs. Barker appears to have figured it out when Young Man enters. He's muscular, well-spoken, the answer to Mommy and Daddy's prayers: The American Dream.

Red by John Logan, winner of the 2010 Tony Award for Best Play.
March 9, 2014, 2 pm at the Currier Museum of Art
Read in relation to Untitled (Red over Brown), 1967, by Mark Rothko, which is in the Currier’s permanent collection.
Master abstract expressionist Mark Rothko has just landed the biggest commission in the history of modern art, a series of murals for New York’s famed Four Seasons Restaurant. In the two fascinating years that follow, Rothko works feverishly with his young assistant, Ken, in his studio on the Bowery. But when Ken gains the confidence to challenge him, Rothko faces the agonizing possibility that his crowning achievement could also become his undoing. Raw and provocative, RED is a searing portrait of an artist's ambition and vulnerability as he tries to create a definitive work for an extraordinary setting.

Work Song by Jeffrey Hatcher and Eric Simonson
July 13, 2014, 2 pm at the Currier Museum of Art
Read in relation to the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Zimmerman House.
In this thrilling and imaginative play about the famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright, audiences get an in-depth look at the master builder at three distinct phases of his life and career: in Act One, as a young man in a hurry to change the way people live and finding inspiration in Mamah Cheney, a unconventional (married) woman who becomes the great love of his life and leads to his greatest tragedy; in Act Two, as a doubting genius at the crossroads, fending off creditors and reeling in clients before he salvages himself by coming up with one of his greatest creations, the house called "Fallingwater"; and in Act Three, as an old showman at twilight, visiting a house from his past and taking stock of his sacrifices and successes in his quest to build the perfect dwelling. WORK SONG is about Wright's ideas, his passions, his love affairs and his tragedies. It's a play about a man who wanted to create the perfect home for the American family but could never build one for himself.

Artist Descending a Staircase by Tom Stoppard. 
October 12, 2014, 2 pm at the Currier Museum of Art
Read in relation to the Currier’s special exhibition, M.C. Escher: Illusion and Reality.
In 1972 an elderly avant garde artist is murdered, leaving his two friends suspecting each other. To reveal why, successive scenes flashback toward the 1920s and then progress back to 1972. Each of the three was infatuated with Sophie. Before she tragically went blind she fell in love with one of them after viewing his picture in a gallery. Which artist Sophie loved has been a bone of contention all their lives. This full length play in one act was a radio play before it was staged to acclaim in London.

A Picasso by Jeffrey Hatcher. 
February 8, 2015, 2 pm at the Currier Museum of Art
Read in relation to Woman Seated in a Chair, 1941, by Pablo Picasso.
Paris, 1941. Pablo Picasso has been summoned from his favorite café by German occupation forces to a storage vault across the city for an interrogation. His questioner: Miss Fischer, a beautiful "cultural attaché" from Berlin. Her assignment: discover which of the three Picasso paintings recently "confiscated" by the Nazis from their Jewish owners are real. The ministry of propaganda has planned an exhibit, and only the great artist himself can attest to their authenticity. At first Picasso agrees to her request, confirming that the three pictures are indeed his own. But when Miss Fischer reveals that the "exhibition" is actually a burning of "degenerate art," Picasso becomes desperate to save his work and engages in a pressurized negotiation with the equally determined and wily Miss Fischer to hold on to two of his precious "children" while consigning the third to the flames. A cat-and-mouse drama about art, politics, sex and truth, with a twist at its climax.

Bakersfield Mist by Stephen Sachs
December 13, 2015, 2 pm at the Currier Museum of Art
Maude, a fifty-something unemployed bartender living in a trailer park, has bought a painting for a few bucks from a thrift store. Despite almost trashing it, she’s now convinced it’s a lost masterpiece by Jackson Pollock worth millions. But when world-class art expert Lionel Percy flies over from New York and arrives at her trailer home in Bakersfield to authenticate the painting, he has no idea what he is about to discover. Inspired by true events, this hilarious and thought-provoking new comedy-drama asks vital questions about what makes art and people truly authentic.

Filming O'Keeffe by Eric Lane. 
March 13, 2016, 2 pm at the Currier Museum of Art
Read in relation to the Cross by the Sea, Canada, 1932, by Georgia O'Keeffe
This funny and moving play is set in Lake George, New York, in the present. Max and his mother, Melissa, live on the property that was once the home of artists Georgia O’Keeffe and Alfred Stieglitz. Max and his classmate Lily are making a film about the legendary artists for a high school project. When Max's estranged grandfather unexpectedly arrives, the four characters clash, as the teenager uncovers his family's hidden past.

Hew Hampshire Humanities CouncilSeasons One and Two of the ARTiculate Playreading Series were supported by The Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation and New Hampshire Humanities.

This season's readings